Custody

Fight for what matters.

When it comes to your child, you want the best. Retain legal counsel well-versed in custody and visitation laws to fight for you and your familial rights. A custody dispute can be one of the most high-stakes legal proceedings of a person’s life. No matter what custody-related matters you’re up against, the legal counsel you retain can have a significant impact on the outcome. So whether your visitation rights are in dispute or you need to fight for full custody of your child, an experienced custody attorney can go to bat for you and pursue the best possible outcome under Ohio law.  

Free Case Evaluation

Are you in the middle of a custody battle? Have you had your visitation rights revoked or been charged with child endangerment? Whatever you’re facing, you need strong representation to fight for your rights. Let an experienced custody lawyer evaluate your case for free today.


FAQ

What can a child custody lawyer do for their client?

A custody lawyer can do a variety of things including securing an order that will allow you to exercise your visitation rights. They can also go through the court to modify an existing child support order. Ultimately, we will help guide you through this difficult process to establish custody and/or find the right schedule that allows you and your child to exercise visitation without interruptions.

What is the difference between having full custody and shared parenting?

If someone has full custody of a child, then he or she is the only person in control of important decisions regarding the child. For example, if your child were injured to the extent that surgery became required, the sole custodian alone would choose whether or not your child undergoes the surgery. Another example is when one party wishes to have their child placed on medication whereas the other parenting party is opposed to this decision. In both of these circumstances, the sole custodian holds all the power and responsibility over these important decisions. A shared parenting agreement requires that both parenting parties come to an agreement prior to making any such decisions as those mentioned above for their child(ren). In both of the previously discussed scenarios, the parties would work together to come to a resolution. A shared parenting agreement does not require that the parties confer with each other on every important decision regarding their child(ren). Rather, the parties are free to designate one or the other as a sole decision maker in an area if they would like. Perhaps one parent has expertise in the medical field and the other trusts that he or she will always make a responsible decision in that area. In that case, the other party might designate them as the sole decision maker without forfeiting their wider shared parenting status.

Is it legal for the custodial parent to deny me a court-ordered visitation with my child?

Failure to follow a court-ordered visitation agreement could necessitate having to file contempt charges against the custodial parent. The custodial parent must have a legitimate reason for denying you visitation. An example would be them holding a reasonable belief that placing the child in your care would put that child in imminent danger or at risk of abuse. Oftentimes, however, custodial parents refuse to allow another parent to exercise visitation illegitimately out of jealousy or for money-related reasons. Denying visitation on these grounds may lead to contempt charges being filed against the violating party. A custody lawyer can see this process through for you.

Qualifications

osba@3x

Member of the Ohio State Bar Association

coumbus-bar-association-brandon-shroy@3x

Member of the Columbus Bar Association

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